Deals: Amazon Cyber Monday

There are even more Kindle books on sale today, for the Cyber Monday Deals.

I purchased:


They have every Boxcar book ever, it looks like, all for a dollar each. In the #120s, there's a zombie one.


I've been looking for this in ebook form for forever. Yay!


Dreadful choice of title considering all the issues surrounding the word 'geisha', and may turn out to be utterly trashy, but I'm hoping it's Ehrenreich-style investigative journalism of hostessing and (maybe?) sex work in modern Tokyo. The read will be interesting; trying to work out how much of it is fact will be tricky.

7 comments:

Will Wildman said...

Ahmigad Boxcar Children. We all know what it's like when the implementation of an idea isn't as good as the premise sounded, but should there be a special name for the situation in which a premise has wasted potential? I'm not sure exactly at what point the writers stopped caring (I remember picking up one later in the series in which they spent the whole book being confused and then, at the last minute, the culprit accidentally dropped a letter in which they confessed/bragged about everything) but the fundamental scenario is basically all 'Would you like to think about class and wealth? TOO BAD, SUCKERS!'

I didn't think about that as a child, of course, but I do remember thinking "Um, their schtick was that they were broke runaways living in a boxcar and solving mysteries; why have you ended the first book by making them uber-rich?" Child-me was highly sensitive to cop-outs.

Ana Mardoll said...

Agreed, so very much. It's such a perfect setting for talking about class and wealth and really exploring that from both sides of the equation, but instead it's very cozy and tidy and fixed up.

Child Me liked it for the slumming aspect. The boxcar stuff was awesome; being adopted by the rich guy at the end was kind of a downer ending for me. WHAT ABOUT ALL YOUR FREEDOMS? Ah, Child Me was so ignorant. *shame*

It *is* a rich GUY, right? He's a widower of some sort?

"Officer, I found these four children living near my property and several of them have worked manual labor for me. I would like to adopt them all, forthwith."

"Sure!"

o.O

Cupcakedoll said...

I loved the Boxcar Children sooooo much when I was eight or whenever. They got to travel to interesting places and go in a houseboat and live in a barn and stuff!

I think they deserve a pass on the class issues by virtue of being old-- originally written in the twenties according to Wiki, which is way older than I would've guessed though even at eight I got the "cutely vintage" vibe from them. Why weren't they mentioned in Ana's-favorite-book-for-that, Girl Sleuth ? Also I now wonder how much the paperback I probably still have somewhere differs from the original text.

And then after some point the series was farmed out to ghostwriters who were not as good, or at least, who realized the concept was milked out but tried to get more milk from it anyway and failed. Which is a shame.

Oh, and they moved in with their Grandpa, not a random creepy guy. So it's ok. Well, "rich grandpa turns out to be super nice and lets them do anything they want" is still a pretty big cop-out, but at least it isn't creepy.

Ana Mardoll said...

Oh, yeah! I forgot he was related.

Are they not mentioned in The Girl Sleuth? How odd! They *should* be. Maybe they were superfluous (to her) to the Bobsey Twins...?

icecoldblank said...

Ana! I spent 4 HOURS on Amazon last night as a direct result of this post of yours!!! That's really all I wanted to say, is that this turned into the Best kind of timesuck for me, and it was wonderful.

Ana Mardoll said...

You're very welcome! I love sharing TimeSucks. :)

Fluffy_goddess said...

Boxcar Children!

Man, I drove my Mom *nuts* with those -- I went through everything they had at the library around the time I was learning to read, so a lot of learning to read was Mom reading to me, or me reading the short pages and getting her help if I didn't know words. She eventually confessed that she hated them, but I learned to read out of them!

Narnia also falls into that category of book. And The Phantom Tollbooth, which was rather wonderful, and perfect for me.

Post a Comment